3 Incredible Online Museums You're Going To Love

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Coming from a family of artists, teachers, inventors, crafters, and designers, I can not get enough of museums and am fortunate that my childhood was filled with them. That being said, it's no wonder that this post is going to be rather short..because not only am I going to an exhibit today, but I spent waaay too much time perusing these online collections. I seriously had a difficult time pulling myself away. If you're looking for inspiration for your next work, a pick-me-up when you're feeling bored or tired, or just looking for a way to pass the time while standing in line, bookmark these now. I'll wait........................ok, good! Enjoy!

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1. Google Street Art

The Google Street Art Project is an ongoing attempt to document and preserve pictures of street art around the world in an easily-accessible and easy-to-navigate database for street art enthusiasts. Started in Google’s Parisian division, the Google Cultural Institute, the database is a unique extension of the Maps project, using the company’s wide-ranging and extensive photos of the world to also identify and preserve street art. You can also see the rest of Google's online museums and exhibits (including the Guggenheim) here

 via google street art

via google street art


2. Europeana Collections

Explore 48,838,151 artworks, artifacts, books, videos and sounds from across Europe. Bruno Racine, Chair of the Europeana Foundation and President of the National Library of France, says:“Europeana Collections gives everyone access to tens of millions of cultural items and artefacts and the new site presents in dazzling detail those given to us in high quality by our 3,500 partners. Nearly 3 million of our higher quality items are also openly licensed, which means people can use them for their own purposes. The range of this open material is breathtaking - from the unique and iconic like a painting by Edvard Munch, or handwritten notes and diagrams by Leonardo Da Vinci, to the unexpected like an allegorical and plundered painting of the Habsburg Emperor Rudolf II or a personal account of the First World War.”

 via europeana collections

via europeana collections


3. MoOM

Otherwise known as the Museum of Online Museums, here, you will find links to online collections and exhibits covering a vast array of interests and obsessions: Start with a review of classic art and architecture, and graduate to the study of mundane (and sometimes bizarre) objects elevated to art by their numbers, juxtaposition, or passion of the collector, like the picture below featured by Manhole Covers of the World.

 via Moom

via Moom


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